Recently Published Papers

As a way of helping our members stay informed of the conflict management literature, this page will list recently published papers. Articles from three conflict management-specific journals—International Journal of Conflict Management, Negotiation and Conflict Management Research, and Negotiation Journal—will be listed automatically upon publication. We would also like to list papers related to conflict management that have been recently published in all other journals. Please help us make this page as comprehensive and as useful as possible by telling us about your recently published papers. Just fill out the form below!

International Journal of Conflict Management

  International Journal of Conflict Management

Recent News from the International Journal of Conflict Management

Negotiation and Conflict Management Research

  Negotiation and Conflict Management Research

Recent News from the Negotiation and Conflict Management Research
Fri, Jul 14, 2017, Continue reading at the source
Abstract This article reviews the literature on the emotion of anger in the negotiation context. I discuss the known antecedents of anger in negotiation, as well as its positive and negative inter- and intrapersonal effects. I pay particular attention to the apparent disagreements within the literature concerning the benefits and drawbacks of using anger to gain advantage in negotiations and employ Attribution Theory as a unifying mechanism to help explain these diverse findings. I call attention to the weaknesses evident in current research questions and methodologies and end with suggestions for future research in this important area. [...]
Fri, Jul 14, 2017, Continue reading at the source
Abstract Deception is pervasive in negotiation, and emotions are integral to the deception process. In this article, we review the theoretical and empirical research on emotions and deception in negotiation and introduce a theoretical model. In our review of the research, we find that emotions profoundly influence the decision to use deception. We also find that although negotiation is inherently interpersonal, theoretical and empirical research on deception has focused on the intrapersonal effects of emotion. For this reason, we integrate theory and research on the interpersonal effects of emotions into research on deception and propose a model—the Interpersonal Emotion Deception Model—that relates the emotions of a counterpart to the deception decisions of a negotiator. Our review and model expands our understanding of the important role of emotions in the deception decision process and provides a theoretical foundation for future research in the intrapersonal and interpersonal perspectives. [...]
Fri, Jul 14, 2017, Continue reading at the source
Fri, Jul 14, 2017, Continue reading at the source

Negotiation Journal

  Negotiation Journal

Recent News from the Negotiation Journal
Negotiation educators recognize that collaborative problem-solving is a critical negotiation skill. Negotiation outcomes are often better when negotiators take a collaborative approach to the process, and they are better able to do this when they are able to take the perspective of the person with whom they are negotiating. Over the years, I have developed several techniques to help my students improve their collaboration and perspective-taking skills. One of these techniques is to use collaborative terminology (BABO = both are better off) rather than more competitive language (win-win). In this article, I describe the strategies I employ in my negotiation class to increase students’ perspective-taking capacities and discuss how this focus enhances their ability to negotiate collaboratively. [...]
Tue, Jul 11, 2017, Continue reading at the source
Negotiation role-playing simulations are among the most effective and widely used methods for teaching and conducting research on negotiations. Teachers and researchers can either license a published, “off-the-shelf” simulation or write their own custom “bespoke” simulation. Off-the-shelf simulations are usually high-quality, include teaching materials, and are typically priced affordably, whereas bespoke simulations are fully customizable and ensure that participants will face a novel challenge. In this article, I introduce a third option: CustomNegotiations.org, a free resource for creating custom negotiation simulations that have the benefits of both off-the-shelf and bespoke simulations. I describe this resource and preview how negotiation instructors can use it to customize simulations for their own classes. I also discuss possible future directions for this kind of platform. [...]
Tue, Jul 11, 2017, Continue reading at the source
Tue, Jul 11, 2017, Continue reading at the source
Tue, Jul 11, 2017, Continue reading at the source

Other Published Papers

Recent News from Other Recently Published Papers