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AOM News

  • AOM announces the incoming coeditors of Annals and the incoming editor of AMJ.
  • 26 January 2022

    In this issue: Member Spotlight: Arthur Brief, AOM 2022 Updates, Incoming Annals and AMJ Editors
  • Originally found at Quality Digest by Dylan Walsh Justin Berg has watched Back to the Future at least 25 times. Same with the DVD special featuresthe voiceovers and backstory and interviews. Its his favorite movie, and hes long believed that part of the films greatness is attributable to the fact that writer-director Robert Zemeckis oversaw the projects full arc, from birth to release. Zemeckis spent several years working on the screenplay before he even started shooting, says Berg, assistant professor of organizational behavior at Stanford Graduate School of Business. I think if instead hed been handed a screenplay that someone else had written, he wouldnt have had a vision for the film that was so unique and developed, so unified and coherent. This possibility got Berg, who studies creativity and innovation, thinking. Most research on implementing creative ideas focuses on how people successfully win support for their ideas from others. But what about, he wondered, actually building creative ideas into creative final products? Once support for an idea exists, what contributes to its successful execution? A new article in the Academy of Management Journal , co-authored with former Stanford GSB doctoral alumna Alisa Yu, finds that, in line with Bergs intuition, handing a mature idea to somebody else for execution harms the creativity of the final product. Instead, people should be involved with creative projects from relatively early in their development because this helps lay the foundation for building creative final products. Specifically, it gives implementers a sense of psychological ownership over the outcomea conviction that the project is truly theirsand helps them develop a coherent vision. Continue reading the original article at Quality Digest Read the original research in Academy of Management Journal Learn more about the AOM Scholars and explore their work: Justin M. Berg, Stanford University Alisa Yu, Stanford University
  • Originally found at Phys.org by Michael Brown Imagine having never seen a handshake. You would know nothing of the different levels of importance and intimacy, when it should be done, what's happening during the shake and even whether you can learn something from the shake itself. Trying to learn about it all at once would be akin to learning a new language. For everyone else, the answers to those questions and dozens more are simply taken for grantedand the handshake, which has survived since time immemorial, long persisted in society as though it were decreed from on high and written in stone. But the handshakeor private property, organizations and even democracy, for that matterare not as ironclad as they appear, according to Chris Steele [research in Academy of Management Review ], a professor in the University of Alberta's School of Business who argues in a new paper that the enactment of institutions we take for granted can hang by a thread and can actively generate change. "In some ways, institutions are incredibly precarious because all it takes is to meet somebody else who also says, "It doesn't have to be like that," and suddenly you can start thinking about how it could be otherwise," said Steele. "Sometimes it doesn't even take that much." Another example is the act of purchasing something. Steele explained that within a store, shoppers don't stop to think about private property, the market system or capitalism, let alone what money is, what sellers and buyers are or what a commodity is. "All of that's in the background. It's stuff that you know and that you can use to make sense of what's happening in front of you, otherwise none of it would make sense," he said. "Sometimes it still doesn't." Continue reading the original article at Phys.org Read the original research in Academy of Management Review Learn more about the AOM Scholars and explore their work: Christopher W. J. Steele, University of Alberta
  • To foster inclusion, some companies are turning to storytelling and encouraging employees to share their stories.